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UNOFFICIAL ELECTION RESULTS

On May 7, 2022, Klein ISD voters made district history as they approved $895,350,000 million in bond funding to benefit every student and school in Klein ISD.

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Proposition A – PASSED

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Proposition B – PASSED

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Proposition C – NOT PASSED

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Proposition D – NOT PASSED

On February 15, the Klein ISD Board of Trustees voted unanimously to place four bond propositions on the May 7 ballot. The 2022 Bond Referendum presents voters with a capital program for the current and long-term development of the District based on recommendations from the Bond Steering Committee.

GET THE FACTS BEFORE YOU VOTE

BOND PROPOSITIONS AT A GLANCE

PROP A

Proposition A would provide $843.8 million to improve safety and security at all schools, build a new intermediate school, address growth and capacity challenges, modernize and restore aging schools (50+ years old), renovate all schools, upgrade academic, arts and athletic/pe spaces, and purchase additional buses as our student population grows. Funds would also be used for additional safety and security measures at every school.

PROP B

Proposition B would allocate $51.5 million for technology devices for classroom instruction, including student, teacher, and staff devices. This proposition would allow for students and teachers on every campus – from elementary school to high school – to learn on the technology used for preparation for college and career.

PROP C

Proposition C would designate $131.3 million for a new district events center with seating for more than 8,000 that would be used for academic events, fine arts performances, athletic competitions, robotics tournaments, career and technology exhibitions, and indoor graduations. The events center would also provide a place to host large indoor events, concerts, and festivals.

PROP D

Proposition D would provide updated training and competition spaces for student-athletes and students showcasing their talents in the arts that are comparable to those in neighboring districts. It would provide $75.2 million for a new district stadium along with renovations to the 55-year-old Klein Memorial Stadium complex.

WHY FOUR PROPOSITIONS

Klein ISD is complying with changes made in 2019 to section 45.003 of the Texas Education Code. It requires school districts to divide bond elections into separate ballot propositions based on what is being financed.

PROPOSITION A BALLOT LANGUAGE

“The issuance of $843,840,000 of bonds for the construction, acquisition, renovation, and equipment of school buildings in the district, for the purchase of the necessary sites for school buildings, for the purchase of new school buses, for the retrofitting of school buses with emergency, safety, or security equipment, and for the purchase or retrofitting of vehicles to be used for emergency, safety, or security purposes, and the levying of a tax sufficient to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds and the costs of any credit agreements executed in connection with the bonds. This is a property tax increase.”

PROPOSITION B BALLOT LANGUAGE

“The issuance of $51,510,000 of bonds for the acquisition or update of district technology equipment, including the acquisition of personal computing devices for students, teachers, and staff, and the levying of a tax sufficient to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds and the costs of any credit agreements executed in connection with the bonds. This is a property tax increase.”

PROPOSITION C BALLOT LANGUAGE

“The issuance of $131,325,000 of bonds for the construction, acquisition, and equipment of a district events center with a seating capacity in excess of 8,000 seats for use in connection with events including indoor athletic competitions, graduations, concerts, performances, convocations, science fairs, and robotics and career and technology exhibitions, and the levying of a tax sufficient to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds and the costs of any credit agreements executed in connection with the bonds. This is a property tax increase.”

PROPOSITION D BALLOT LANGUAGE

“The issuance of $75,190,000 of bonds for the construction, acquisition, renovation, and equipment of district stadiums, including the construction of a new district stadium and renovations to Memorial Stadium, and the levying of a tax sufficient to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds and the costs of any credit agreements executed in connection with the bonds. This is a property tax increase.”

TaX INFO

Klein ISD taxes are frozen for homeowners 65+ who have properly filed with the Harris County Tax Office. Approval of this bond would not result in an increase above the frozen amount.

Historical & Proposed Klein ISD Tax Rate

Tax rate will remain 10¢ lower than in 2014.

Passage of all four bond propositions would result in a MAXIMUM tax rate increase of $0.03. This will keep our tax rate lower than it was in 2021 and $0.10 lower than it was in 2014. For the average home in Klein ISD ($255K), the impact could be approximately $5.75 per month.

*Estimated tax rate if all four propositions pass. 

Comparing Local School District 2021 Tax Rates

Klein ISD’s current tax rate is the lowest it’s been in 11 years.

How do property appraisals impact homeowners? The assessed value of your home is set by the Harris County Appraisal District, not Klein ISD. Property taxes are calculated by multiplying the district tax rate by each $100 of the taxable value of your property. Therefore, if your assessed taxable value goes up, the amount you pay will go up even if the tax rate remains unchanged.

Klein ISD Historical Tax Rate Management

Klein ISD’s Historical Bond Background

Klein ISD has a strong tradition of making fiscally conservative projections and then, outperforming those projections. As noted on the “Historical Tax Rate Management” graphs from the 2004, 2008, and 2015 bond referendums, all came in under the projected maximum tax rate.

In 2004, Klein ISD voters authorized bonds requiring a $0.07 increase, and the rate did not increase at all ($0.00).

In 2008, Klein ISD voters authorized bonds requiring a $0.26 increase, and the rate only increased by $0.18.

In 2015, Klein ISD voters authorized bonds requiring a $0.099 increase, and the rate only increased by $0.04.

This was achieved through the combination of property values growth and strategically timing bond sales, along with refunding of older bonds.

Frequently Asked Questions

Did Klein ISD solicit the input of local citizens before developing the bond package?

Yes.  As part of Klein ISD’s ongoing management of finances, facilities and long-range planning efforts, a Bond Steering Committee met in 2021 to recommend and develop a long-term capital program. The Bond Steering Committee’s goal was to make sure every student in every school has access to modern classrooms, quality academic programs, and educational tools and resources. After months of extensive work, the committee developed comprehensive bond recommendations to reflect the wishes of the Klein ISD community and its taxpayers and presented their report to the Board of Trustees for its consideration.

Was every facility in the school district reviewed during the committee process?

Yes. With the goal of making sure we impact every student in every school, our Bond Steering Committee considered the needs of every school and facility in the district.

Why call a bond referendum now?

Historically, the district anticipated needing another bond referendum in 2020. Based on our current capacity challenges and condition of aging schools, Klein ISD would have preferred to call a bond referendum sooner. However, we were mindful of the impact COVID-19 was having on our families and their finances and with active fiscal and facility management of the 2015 Bond program, Klein ISD was able to stretch the 2015 program through effective resource management. Now that the recovery from COVID-19 is underway and bond interest rates are near record lows, the bond steering committee recommended the proposed bond package and the Board of Trustees determined the final proposal and the need for the district to move forward with the timing of this election. 

What was the final vote by the Board of Trustees?

On February 15, 2022, the Klein ISD Board of Trustees unanimously voted to place a bond referendum including four propositions on the May 7, 2022 ballot.

What is a bond, and why do I have to vote on it?

Just as homeowners borrow money in the form of a mortgage to finance the purchase of a home, a school district borrows money in the form of bonds to finance the construction of new schools and other capital projects. Both are repaid over time. A school district is required by law to seek approval from voters in the form of a bond election in order to issue bonds.

How will students involved in extracurricular activities be impacted?

The new district events center (Proposition C) would be used for academic events, athletic competitions, career and technology exhibitions, fine arts performances, robotics tournaments,  indoor graduations, and large community events. The bond package would also include a new stadium and renovations to the 55-year-old Klein Memorial Stadium complex (Proposition D) to bring Klein ISD facilities used for training and competition in the arts and athletics in line with those in neighboring districts. Additionally, new musical instruments in Proposition A are proposed. 

What is going to be the tax impact of the bond package on Klein ISD taxpayers?

Passage of all four bond propositions could result in a maximum I&S tax rate increase of approximately $0.03. This will keep our overall Klein ISD tax rate lower than it was in 2021 and 10¢ lower than it was in 2014. For the average home in Klein ISD ($255K), the impact could be approximately $5.75 per month.

Will my Klein ISD taxes increase if I am over 65 and my current tax bill is less than the frozen amount established when I turned 65?

Your Klein ISD taxes would increase by the actual calculated amount with the new tax rate and current property values but will not exceed the frozen amount established when you turned 65 and/or when your ceiling was established.

What will be the impact on senior citizens in the district?

Klein ISD taxes are frozen for homeowners 65 or older who have properly filed with the Harris County Tax Office, therefore approval of this bond would not result in an increase above the frozen amount.

Should voters approve the bond package, does the district have policies in place to make sure our tax dollars are spent efficiently?

Yes. Just like we did with previous bond packages, our team of financial professionals will continue to  keep a close eye on the spending approved by voters. Our best practices approach has helped Klein ISD earn the highest ranking, “Superior”, from the state’s Financial Integrity Rating System (FIRST) 19 years in a row and achieve an ‘A’ district finance accountability rating from the Texas Education Agency.

What is the status of recent bond packages?

Recent capital construction projects were collectively completed on time and under budget. In fact, with our cost efficiency efforts and by refinancing and refunding bonds, Klein ISD has recently saved taxpayers over $70 million through five separate bond refinancing opportunities.

How can Bond funds be used?

Bond funds can be used to pay for new buildings, additions and renovations to existing facilities, land acquisition, technology infrastructure, and equipment for new or existing buildings. By law, Bond funds cannot be used for district operating and maintenance expenses, such as teacher salaries, utility bills, and routine building maintenance. 

Upon approval of the bond referendum, is the entire amount issued all at once?

No. As Klein ISD has done historically, if passed, this Bond won’t be sold all at once. Bonds are authorized by voters and are sold in increments over time as needed to fund the projects.

Who do we contact if we want more information about the bond referendum?

Klein ISD is committed to transparency. Should you have any questions or would like more information please email us at feedback@kleinisd.net.

Why did Klein ISD choose May 7 for the election?

The uniform election date in May of an even-numbered year (2022) is a date on which many local political subdivisions, such as school districts, cities, and water districts, have their regular general elections for members of their governing bodies or special elections to fill vacancies. Additionally, this May uniform election date will include proposed constitutional amendments passed by the Texas Legislature during its recent special sessions.

How does the District determine the projected tax rate impact of the proposed bonds?

In projecting the potential tax rate impact from the issuance of the proposed bonds, the District utilizes projections from the District’s financial advisor, RBC Capital Markets, that take into account a number of factors, including the timing and structure of future bond issues, estimated interest rates and estimates of future property values.

Based on the declining debt service on the District’s currently outstanding debt obligations and forecasted amounts of property tax revenue to be collected each year, the District estimates that if approved, the bonds authorized under Propositions A and B could be paid without an increase to the District’s current tax rate.

If Propositions A, B, C and D were all approved, the bonds authorized under Propositions A, B, C and D could be paid with an increase in the District’s current tax rate of approximately $0.03. The District has traditionally outperformed its projections.

What is the impact of the tax levy language in the proposition?

The type of debt that the Texas Legislature has authorized the district to issue is technically secured by an unlimited ad valorem tax. That is why the language appears in the election order. However, in Section 45.0031 of the Education Code, the Texas Legislature has also established what is referred to as the $0.50 test. It serves as a limit on how much total debt a school district can issue. It requires that prior to the issuance of any series of bonds, the District must demonstrate to the Texas Attorney General that the district has the ability to pay the maximum annual debt service on the bonds and all previously issued bonds from a tax rate that does not exceed $0.50 per $100 of assessed valuation. The District does not currently anticipate that the issuance of the bonds proposed under Propositions A, B, C, and D would implicate the $0.50 test.

If Propositions A, B, C, and D were all approved, the bonds authorized under Propositions A, B, C, and D would be paid with a MAXIMUM increase in the District’s current tax rate of $0.03. This will keep our tax rate lower than it was in 2021 and $0.10 lower than it was in 2014.

The District has traditionally outperformed its projections.

BOND PLANNING PROCESS

Klein ISD referendum planning process was managed by a diverse, 100-community member Bond Steering Committee.

This bond program is the result of our Klein ISD community coming together to assess the District’s facilities, technology, safety and security, fine arts, and athletics. Our Bond Steering Committee of parents, grandparents, teachers, staff and business and community leaders from across the school district should be commended for their thoughtful and comprehensive work in bringing recommendations forward to benefit our Klein ISD students, staff, families, and community.

As we look to the future in this District that I’ve been a part of since I was a student in Klein ISD, it is our hope that these efforts meet the expectations of the Klein ISD community of teachers, parents, grandparents, and taxpayers.

Ronnie K. Anderson

Klein ISD School Board President

As part of the district’s ongoing management of finances and facilities, the Klein ISD Board of Trustees commissioned a Bond Steering Committee in November 2021 to develop a long-term capital program. Their goal was to make sure every student in every school has access to modern classrooms, academic programs, educational tools and resources.

The committee of almost 100 parents, grandparents, teachers, staff and business and community leaders from across Klein ISD, and directed by a professional facilitator, reviewed financial data, current curriculum and projected student growth and toured existing campuses. After months of extensive study, the committee developed a comprehensive bond recommendation to reflect the wishes of the Klein ISD community and its taxpayers.

WHAT’s PROPOSED

On February 15, the Klein ISD Board of Trustees voted unanimously to place four bond propositions on the May 7 ballot. The 2022 Bond Referendum presents voters with a capital program for the current and long-term development of the District based on recommendations from the Bond Steering Committee.

PROPOSITION A

$843,840,000

IMPROVE SAFETY & SECURITY

  • Security monitoring improvements at every school
  • Districtwide cybersecurity enhancements
  • Exterior and parking lot lighting replacement and upgrades
  • Addition of security vestibules at Doerre Intermediate, Kleb Intermediate, Klein Intermediate, and Klein Oak High School

ADDRESS GROWTH & CAPACITY CHALLENGES

  • Construction of new Intermediate School #11
  • Purchase of additional buses
  • Classroom additions to address capacity challenges at Klein Cain High School and Klein Oak High School

MODERNIZE AGING SCHOOLS

  • Comprehensive renovations to eight schools over 50 years of age: Epps Island Elementary, Greenwood Forest Elementary, Haude Elementary, Northampton Elementary, Theiss Elementary, Hildebrandt Intermediate, Strack Intermediate, and Wunderlich Intermediate

RENOVATE ALL SCHOOLS

  • Classroom furniture and equipment modernizations
  • Technology infrastructure improvements
  • Life cycle replacements and upgrades
  • Reconstruct school support facilities

UPGRADE ACADEMIC, ARTS & PE/ATHLETIC SPACES

  • New career and technical education equipment
  • New musical instruments
  • Theatre renovations at Klein Collins High School and Klein Forest High School
  • Fine Arts additions at Doerre Intermediate and Kleb Intermediate
  • Gym additions at Doerre Intermediate, Kleb Intermediate, Klein Intermediate, Krimmel Intermediate, Schindewolf Intermediate, and Klein Forest High School

PROPOSITION B

$51,510,000

PROVIDE CLASSROOM TECHNOLOGY

  • New student and teacher devices at every school
  • New classroom instructional technology at every school

PROPOSITION C

$131,325,000

BUILD DISTRICT EVENTS CENTER

  • Construction of a new district events center to feature academics, fine arts, athletics, career and technical education programs, graduation ceremonies, and large community events and gatherings
  • Building site located on existing Klein ISD-owned land at 7500 FM 2920 adjacent to KMPC
  • Indoor seating for over 8,000

PROPOSITION D

$75,190,000

BUILD NEW DISTRICTWIDE STADIUM

  • Construction of a new districtwide stadium located on existing Klein ISD-owned land at 7500 FM 2920 adjacent to KMPC
  • Outdoor seating for over 8,000

RENOVATE KLEIN MEMORIAL STADIUM

  • Bring the 55-year-old Klein Memorial Stadium (built in 1967) up to current standards

Proposed projects are subject to Board approval based on changes in circumstances and market conditions.

FISCAL MANAGEMENT HIGHLIGHTS

  • Klein ISD has recently saved taxpayers over $70 million through five separate bond refinancing opportunities.

  • Bond interest rates are near all-time lows in the 42-year history of the Bond Buyer Index.

  • If passed, this Bond won’t be sold all at once. Bonds are authorized by voters and are sold in increments over time as needed to fund the projects.

  • State law allows for bonds to be financed for up to 40 years. However, Klein ISD’s repayment schedules are matched up with the useful life of the assets being constructed or purchased. Klein ISD generally limits the maximum term to 30 years.

  • Klein ISD maintains high credit ratings from bond-rating agencies. Klein ISD’s bonds are currently rated AA from S&P Global Ratings and Aa1 from Moody’s.

  • Klein ISD has received the highest rating available, Superior, from the state’s Financial Integrity Rating System and achieved an ‘A’ district accountability rating from the Texas Education Agency.